What Is the Right Privacy Screen for My Yard?

By Nancy Penrose

Everyone wants to be able to relax and have fun in their yard with the same level of comfort and privacy they enjoy inside their own home. The best and most aesthetic way to achieve this is with a privacy screen of trees.

Privacy screen trees or hedges make up a sort of “living fence”. They help to obscure the view to your yard while also adding to the beauty of your landscape and local neighborhood. They also have a few other benefits, like reducing street noise and buffering against the wind and other weather conditions.

Here are some of our top picks for trees that do very well as privacy screen trees:

Emerald Green Arborvitae Thuja occidentalis ‘emerald green’

This is one of the most popular privacy screen trees because they build a “wall of green” and take up very little yard space. They can get up to 18’ tall and 3’ wide, but you can trim them to stay at whatever height you want. A great choice for narrow planting areas. They are fairly slow growing and very low maintenance. These trees retain their deep green color all year round.

Excelsa Cedar Thuja plicata ‘excelsa’

This tree maintains its density and symmetrical form without growing to extreme heights (they average at a maximum height of 40’ tall and 15’ wide.) They grow 2-3’ a year and if you have the space, make an excellent privacy screen. These trees can be hedged as well, but since they are such fast growers, it is a little more maintenance than the Emerald Green Arborvitae

Green Giant Thuja standishii x plicata

This tree is a happy medium between the Emerald Green and Excelsa cedar. They can get up to 40’ tall, but only 8’ wide. This is a fast growing tree (about 2’ to 3’ a year) which makes for a very good substitute if you simply want a bigger Emerald Green Arborvitae. They tend to fill in and get more dense as they grow older. They have no serious pest or disease problems and are very hardy.

English Laurel Prunus laurocerasus ‘English Laurel’

This shrub is a vigorous grower and very hardy. It is one of the few evergreens with very broad leaves that are hardy in cold climates, and can tolerate shade. They can get 20’ tall and 15’ wide if not pruned annually.

Schipka Laurel Prunus laurocerasus ‘Schipkaensis’ Schipka Larel

A large evergreen shrub with dense, erect branches and brilliant green foliage. In spring it has fragrant white flowers and fruit that attract birds. A popular choice for formally pruned hedges, group plantings or privacy screens.

Portugal Laurel Prunus lusitanica ‘Portugal’ Laurel

The Portugal Laurel is a bushy, evergreen shrub or tree with dark green leaves (which are much smaller that the related, Prunus laurocerasus. It has reddish new shoots (stems) which look attractive against the dark green leaves. If left untrimmed it produces masses of small fragrant white flowers in early summer followed be small red to dark purple fruits.

Leyland Cypress Cupressocyparis leylandii

Last but not least is the Leyland Cypress, an excellent choice as a fast growing, large screening tree. Growing up to 3’ to 4’ per year, the Leyland Cypress fills in quickly (reaching heights of 60’ when fully mature). If you have enough room for the tree’s mature size, it requires very little maintenance. It also responds to shearing and works well as a hedge.

No matter what tree you find to be right for your yard, you will enjoy added comfort and beauty with a privacy screen of trees.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Big Tree Planting Company Helps Restore Yard After Fire

Big Trees Inc Helps Handle Yard Affected by Accidental Fire in Olympic Peninsula Area

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc, (bigtreesupply.com) a tree nursery and transplanting company in the Seattle area, recently helped with a situation where a homeowner’s yard had been subjected to an accidental fire. The fire burned down several trees in the yard, which Big Tress Inc was able to replace successfully, restoring the original landscape.

Big Trees Inc was recently contacted by a homeowner in the Olympic Peninsula area whose trees had been accidently burned down by a neighbor’s subcontractor. The homeowner had a mature row of 12′ tall Emerald Green arborvitae that ran alongside their driveway and helped to screen the neighbor’s driveway. Unfortunately, when the neighbor hired somebody to asphalt their driveway, their machinery caught the trees on fire burning a long section of trees.

“Sometimes these situations can get very contentious with blame and accountability,” said Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees Inc. “In this case, everyone involved worked together, including the insurance company!”

Big Trees Inc was hired to install 12’ Emerald Greens matching the height of the surviving trees to fill in the now empty space between the two neighbors.

“We did not know you could buy mature trees,” said the homeowner. “We were ecstatic when we heard about Big Trees and they were very accommodating as far as sending pictures of their trees and fitting us into their schedule. Their crew worked all day in the pouring down rain to get it done and now, it looks even better than it did before the fire! We couldn’t be more pleased.”

Nancy Penrose stated: “We have seen so many examples of jobs like these where a successful tree installation is able to ease the tension between neighbors. We’re very pleased to be of service.”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

How Much Water Do My Trees Need?

By Nancy Penrose

A question we get asked often is, “How much should I water my trees?” The reality is this is not always an easy question to answer. It can depend on a lot of factors, such as the type of tree, the weather and general climate, soil conditions, etc. The one thing is certain, If you are planting a new tree, it will need to be watered often, if not daily.

The water a tree receives when it is young, can determine the longevity and overall health and appearance of a mature tree. Here are general points that any homeowner should be thinking of when caring for new and established trees.

How often do I need to water a new tree?

It can take 1-3 years (depending on size) for a new tree become established in its permanent environment. During this time, the tree is sending most of its energy into building new roots. This will serve not only to anchor the tree, but most importantly, take up water and nutrients. It is critical to make sure the soil does not dry out during this time. Once the tree is anchored into the ground and the roots have entered the native soil, you can start to reduce supplemental water. This critical period typically lasts about a year.

Why do I need to water a new tree even if it has been raining?

Dense tree canopies, especially that of evergreen trees, can shield the ground under the tree and block rainwater from entering the critical root area. Think of the tree acting as an umbrella over the roots of the tree. On rainy days, check the soil directly under the tree for moisture. Soil that holds shape when squeezed in the palm of your hand has adequate soil moisture. If the soil falls apart, or does not hold shape, considering giving it some supplemental water. Once the tree is established, the roots will grow past the canopy of the tree (out from under the umbrella) and will be able to access moisture in the soil better.

How much water should I give my trees?

Here is a rule of thumb you can use. New trees require 1 gallon per inch of trunk diameter the first growing season. Using this rule, a 2 inch diameter tree would require 2 gallons of water per day.

Established trees typically can go much longer without supplemental irrigation and typically a 2-3 hour slow soak with a garden hose will be enough for most species. Signs of drought stress can be early fall color, thinning canopies, and burned leaf tips. These signs could be an early indication that your tree needs a drink.

Can a tree get too much water?

Yes. Tree roots need oxygen to grow and expand. Too much water can suffocate the roots, causing root decline and dieback. Signs of overwatering can be mimic underwatering, so it can be tricky to detect. If you can squeeze water from a handful of soil, you are likely overwatering. Look for signs such as yellowing or grey foliage, mid-summer leaf drop, and a thinning canopy.

Are There Recommended Methods for Watering?

We recommend drip irrigation for most applications. Drip irrigation provides a slower supply of water which reduces runoff and allows the water to penetrate deep into the soil where the roots are.

New trees that have not yet become established, need to have irrigation focused closer to the trunk of the tree, directly over the root balls. Mature trees have roots that spread out as far as 1.5 times the height of the tree, so they need water distributed evenly under most of the canopy of the tree. Consider adding a 2 inch layer of much under the dripline of the tree. This can help retain soil moisture and also provide nutrients to the soil as it breaks down.

Do I need to water my trees in the fall and winter?

All trees enter a dormancy period (even evergreens) at which time they are not actively growing. This varies greatly from region to region, but you do not need to water your trees when they are dormant. A general rule is when fall colors start to show on deciduous trees, its time to stop watering for the season.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Tree Transplanting Company Makes Local Remodel Possible

Successful Transplanting Reputation Makes Remodel Easier for Lake Sammamish Resident

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc, (www.bigtreesupply.com) a tree nursery and transplanting company in Northwest Washington, was recently called in to assist with a local remodeling project. The company’s reputation spurred a neighbor to recommend Big Trees to move an entire garden bed of trees and rhododendrons in order to accommodate the homeowner’s remodeling efforts.

The homeowner had been hesitant to move forward with a project that involved moving her driveway, as it would mean destroying the massive garden bed and the screening it provided between her and her neighbor. She knew she could put in new trees but did not want to get rid of the existing trees which had been part of her landscape for the last 20 years. A neighbor told the woman about Big Trees and their excellent reputation for moving large trees successfully.

Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees Inc., was available for comment: “I met the homeowner at her site and was pleased to see that everything she wanted moved looked like good transplant candidates and nothing too complicated. We basically shifted a garden bed that is 80’ long and 20’ wide over 50’ from its original location.”

The homeowner was very pleased with the arrangement, and the move was executed with no difficulty. Nancy Penrose stated: “These types of projects are win-win on all fronts. The homeowner, the neighbors and the existing trees are all happy!”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

The 10 Best Autumn Trees

By Nancy Penrose

With Autumn finally here, it’s time to celebrate one of the things that makes this season great: the Autumn trees. The shower of reds, oranges and yellows in the leaves change the landscape completely. Fall’s tree colors are something we look forward to every year, the effect it has on the scenery is really special. You should see the Big Trees Inc nursery this time of year!

To commemorate the season we’d like to share some of our picks for the best Autumn trees. Limiting this list to just 10 wasn’t easy with so many amazing and popular trees in different areas. But here is our short list of the top picks for fall:

1. Japanese Maple

The Japanese Maple is an almost exotic specimen which readily finds it home here in the Pacific Northwest. It is generally grown for its interesting shape and attractive foliage throughout the year, but it has striking fall coloration as well. This makes a very distinct and impressive addition to a yard.

2. Red Maple

There are so many beautiful Red Maples which really make this season special, it is impossible to list them all. The Red Sunset Maple is one of the most reliable trees for fall color, turning a brilliant orange-red to deep red in early fall. The Autumn Blaze Maple has brilliant red color, and is one of the first trees to go into fall color yet one of the longest to hold its fall colors. This is one of the great staples of the season.

3. Ginkgo

The Ginkgo is a regular Fall favorite, and for very good reason. Undoubtedly one of the most distinct and beautiful deciduous trees, this tree showcases a lovely yellow foliage in the fall. It is also possibly the oldest tree on earth, with fossils of the Ginkgo tree dating over 200 million years old.

4. Red Oak

The ‘Red’ Oak tree becomes a tall, significant deciduous tree with green leaves.  It likes well-draining soils but can moderately tolerate damp soils as well.  It develops into a very large shade tree with red fall color.

The Red Oak is a majestic tree which can grow to very large sizes (can get over 100 feet tall). Its distinct bright red leaves are stunning in the fall, particularly popular in the Eastern US.

5. Dogwood

Cornus florida, commonly known as flowering dogwood, is a small deciduous tree that typically grows 15-30’ tall with a low-branching, broadly-pyramidal but somewhat flat-topped habit. It arguably may be the most beautiful of the native American flowering trees. It is native from Maine to southern Ontario to Illinois to Kansas, south to Florida, Texas and Mexico. It is the state tree of Missouri and Virginia. It blooms in early spring (April) shortly after, but usually overlapping, the bloom period of the redbuds.

Both the Dogwood and the Flowering Dogwood make for really stunning trees in the fall. From pink to snowy white, the leaves of the Dogwoods really stand out in the fall among the traditional yellow-red. A beautiful addition to a yard or garden, a landscape will definitely become the center of attention with this tree.

6. Sweetgum

The Sweetgum progresses through a variety of fall colors. The distinct five-lobed star shaped leaves change from yellow to orange and red to purple in fall. It is a dependable tree for a good fall color show. Unlike maples, the Sweetgum’s fall color will not be uniform over the canopy. This gives it a unique fall color each year.

7. Quaking Aspen

The ‘Quaking Aspen’ tree is admired for its rounded, wind blown leaves and the white tones of their trunks, often planted in groves.  The trees have tall trunks, up to 80 feet tall, with smooth pale bark, scarred with black. The glossy green leaves, dull beneath, become golden to yellow, rarely red, in autumn.  These trees grow in moist to damp conditions that are well draining, and can spread and send up new trees through their root systems.

The Quaking Aspen, common in colder areas of North America, is a beautiful tree with distinctive white bark and golden yellow leaves. Clusters of Aspens together add a splash of color to autumn that are a sight to behold.

8. Katsura

The Katsura tree is grown as both a single stemmed or multi-stemmed tree. It has rounded heart shaped leaves that emerge in spring with a red to purple tint. As the leaves mature they turn a slightly bluish green. The Katsura has yellow fall color and they are known for the sweet sugary scent they emit as fall arrives.

9. Bloodgood

Slender airy tree well suited for use as a patio or small lawn tree. It has attractive burgundy red foliage turning brilliant scarlet in the fall.

10. Vanessa
Parrotia persica ‘Vanessa’

The Persian Ironwood ‘Vanessa’ tree is more of a columnar of the Persian Ironwood tree, and provides interest to gardens with its slightly kinked branches and strong structural presence.  With small red flowers in the spring, and becoming a small to medium height deciduous tree with shiny leaves, the ‘Vanessa’ Persian Ironwood tree can be useful in somewhat more slender, well-draining  environments.

With so many beautiful trees it really is hard to choose the best. If we missed your favorite, write to us at info@bigtreesupply.com and tell us about it!

In the end the really great thing about autumn is the pure variety of trees around us. It makes for quite a show that mother nature rolls out every year. At Big Trees Inc, we couldn’t think of any better show around.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property in the San Juan Islands Gets a “Living” Fence

Tree Transplantation Company Helps Homeowners Set Up Privacy Screen Trees for Yard

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc, (www.bigtreesupply.com) tree transplantation and tree nursery company located in the Puget Sound area, was recently asked for help by a family in the San Juan Islands off the Northwest coast of Washington. Big Trees Inc. found that the family was dissatisfied with the fence surrounding the property, and they were able to help the family get a screen of privacy trees around their property to function as an improved “fence” for the estate.

Big Trees Inc was contacted by a homeowner who had bought a property in the San Juan Islands. The property sat on a beautiful bluff with beach access and sweeping 180 degree views of the water. The property was meticulously landscaped, but the only potential issue for the family was a wooden fence along the property that did not match with the natural setting of the rest of the property. The fence was, however, effective in screening the property and providing privacy from the neighbors. Big Trees was consulted on creating a “living fence’, a line of privacy screen trees, as a more natural look for the landscape but that still maintained privacy.

The planting area was somewhat limited to how large the trees could eventually get, so Big Trees Inc recommended Emerald Green Giants for the site (evergreens that grow up to 30’ tall, but only 8-10’ wide). The trees worked out to be a perfect solution that accommodated the long-term needs of the family. The family was very satisfied with the result, and felt they’d gotten a much more natural, organic landscape, and the family settled into their new home.

“Working with homeowners and coming up with solutions that are both satisfying and have long-term viability is a fun part of my business,” said Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees Inc.

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Tree Transplanting Company Helps Resolve Neighborhood Conflict

Big Trees Inc Helps Neighbors in North Seattle Area Resolve Dispute

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (https://bigtreesupply.com/), tree transplanting and tree nursery company operating out of the Puget Sound area in Washington State, has undergone many projects to help their community. Most recently the company helped two neighbors resolve a dispute regarding the trees in their yards – a dispute which ended on good terms for all concerned.

Big Trees Inc was recently contacted by a local homeowner in the Edmonds area, north of Seattle. A neighbor had cut down all trees in their own yard in order to get a better view of the Puget Sound. Unfortunately, for the Big Trees customer, it meant they were now looking directly into their back porch, all sense of privacy gone in a day. Big Trees Inc was called to see if a solution could be found that would recover the sense of privacy between the homes, and end the dispute on friendly terms. After reviewing the site, Big Trees recommended planting a row of laurels between the two homes, a tree that would screen the view of the yard, but not grow tall enough to screen the neighbor’s view of the Puget Sound. The trees were planted, and this eventually lead to a resolution for the two families.

“Situations like these are all too common here in the Puget Sound area,” says Nancy Penrose, Owner of Big Trees.  “Fortunately, Big Trees was able to offer a solution that worked for everybody.  Because we offer larger stock than most retail nurseries, we can be an instant solution to people’s privacy issues with neighbors.  In one day their privacy was lost, and in two days with a new hedge, their privacy was restored. It’s fun to be part of a solution that hopefully makes everybody happy.”

Nancy Penrose is the owner of Big Trees Inc., located in Snohomish, WA in the Seattle area. The company is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They not only deliver young trees, but also mature trees in a wide range of sizes. Some types of trees available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. The company also does tree transplanting including large trees. Their blog can be seen at https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/ or http://arboristblog.com/. They can be reached at 360-563-2700.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Increasing the Property Value of Your Home is Just One More Reason to Plant a Tree (If You Needed Another Reason) By Nancy Penrose

Adding a tree to your landscape adds beauty to your yard and your neighborhood. It helps the local climate by countering CO2 emissions. It enriches the neighborhood by providing a calmer landscape, providing more shade and protection for pedestrians. And research has even suggested that it reduces traffic speeds in neighborhoods, with fewer instances of road rage in greener areas.

Now there’s one other point which not everyone considers: planting a tree can actually increase the property value of your home!

Per one study, good tree cover in an area increased property values by 7%, and another study found this could go as high as 15% depending on the area.

Another study found that a large tree in the front yard of a home could boost the property value of a home by as much as $7,000.

Another indicated that there could be an increase of as much as $15,000 to $25,000 of the property value of a home if there are trees in the front yard or by the street.

In a study on the effect of privacy screen trees planted around a yard, it was found that this could increase the value of a medium-sized property up to 7% or a larger property up to 11%.

We know that trees add aesthetic beauty to a landscape and have other benefits, and this is most likely the reason why it adds property value. A tree will grow with the years and become a better and better addition to a yard. A privacy screen of trees can be an added benefit and selling point to a home, as it adds privacy to the yard.

There are also some factors you need to look out for. Planting a tree too close to a home can be a problem, for instance if the roots will grow into the foundation and cause damage. Also a tree that in any way poses a security hazard will have to be handled not only for the safety of all concerned but also for the property value. Damaged trees can decrease this advantage to property value, so it’s important to make sure the trees are well cared for.

But if a homeowner does their research well, or consults a tree transportation specialist, and finds the right trees for their yard that will really enhance their yard, it can be of great benefit not only to them but the whole neighborhood as well.

 

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

Tree Transplantation Company Saves Memorial Tree in Washington

SNOHOMISH, WA: Big Trees Inc., (https://bigtreesupply.com/), a tree transplanting and big tree nursery, located in Snohomish, WA, undertook a project on behalf of a local family to save a memorial Giant Sequoia. Big Trees was able to perform the seemingly impossible task of transplanting a massive tree to its new home.

The family had made the decision to move out of state, but had some serious concerns for the Sequoia, which had served as a memorial for the patriarch of the family that had passed several years prior. The new homeowners had plans to remodel the property that included cutting down the memorial tree. Of course, the family jumped into action to save the tree! They coordinated with a local park to donate the Sequoia onto their property, and Big Trees was asked to perform the transplanting services.

As often happens with big projects, with lots of coordination of large machinery are involved, a timing issue came up the day before the move. The planting space at the park was not ready. No problem, Big Trees dug the tree, prepared the root ball, and loaded the tree onto a truck to bring back to their own nursery for safe keeping until the planting site at the park was ready. After a few weeks, the site had been properly prepared and Big Trees transported the tree to the park. It was planted successfully where it will be enjoyed for many generations to come.

Nancy Penrose, owner of Big Trees Inc, said “It was such a cool thing this family was doing. Although it did not go exactly as originally planned, everything worked out and the tree is now in a more permanent location where the family can come and visit when they are in town.”

Big Trees Inc. is one of the largest tree nurseries in the Seattle area with over 120,000 trees available in over 300 varieties. They deliver a wide variety of sizes, from young to very mature. Some types of trees that are available include spring flowering, deciduous, evergreen, and privacy trees. Other services include transplanting and tree care and maintenance.

Big Trees Inc.
10928 Springhetti Rd
Snohomish, WA 98296
360-563-2700
https://bigtreesupply.com/blog/
https://arboristblog.com
https://bigtreesupply.com

How big is too big for a tree to be transplanted?

By Nancy Penrose

There are many reasons you would want to transplant a tree. One reason could be that a tree is not in an ideal location for it to thrive. Another is the yard is being redesigned and a tree is in the way, but it is still part of the final plan. There are a myriad of reasons why a tree needs to be relocated on a property. Below are some guidelines that will determine whether a tree is a good candidate for transplanting.

A question that gets asked of us a lot is, “Can a tree be too big to successfully move?” There is not a clear-cut answer of yes or no. There are many circumstances that will make or break a transplant. Consulting a professional tree transplanting service is always advised. When we consult on a potential project we try and be upfront about the chances of success and the post-transplant conditions that should be maintained for the tree to thrive in its new location.

There are some basic factors that govern how to successfully transplant a tree.

  • The age of the tree
  • The size of the tree
  • Access to where the tree is currently and where it is being relocated to

Another key point to consider in any transplant are the roots. For any transplant to be successful requires getting a large enough root ball to sustain the tree after the relocation. Cutting too many of the roots will cause transplant shock that will be too devastating for it to recover from. There is a formula to make sure you are getting an adequate root ball. First, measure the diameter of the trunk 12 inches above soil level. For every diameter inch, the root ball will have to be 12 inches wide. For instance, if the diameter of the trunk is 2 inches the root ball that will need to be dug is 24 inches wide. Using this formula will give the tree enough roots to sustain itself until it can establish a new root system.

A tree that has a 2-inch diameter or less can usually be safely moved by a homeowner within their own yard. 2 to 4 inches in diameter becomes exponentially more difficult. Above 4 inches should be handled by professionals.

In close, if you are in doubt about if a tree that you would like moved is too big or not, seeking professional help is always best. Professionals will be able to help you decide not only whether a tree is a good candidate for transplant, but also, help you find the best location for its long-term success.